Clinics & Services

Adult Immunisation

 

At the Beaumont Practice we offer the following vaccines to adults:

 

Vaccines for 'at-risk' people

  • The flu jab

  • Chickenpox vaccine

  • BCG (TB) vaccine

  • Flu jab for pregnant women

  • Whooping cough vaccine for pregnant women

  • Hepatitis B vaccine

  • MMR for non-immune adults

  • Men ACWY vaccine for students

 

 

Vaccines for over-65s

  • Pneumococcal PPV vaccine

  • Annual flu vaccine

 

 

Vaccines for 70s

  • Shingles vaccine

  • Flu vaccine

 

 

For further information on any of these vaccines please visit NHS Health A-Z Vaccines information clicking on the link below:

 

//www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vaccinations/Pages/vaccination-schedule-age-checklist.aspx

 

 

We also offer other Vaccines privately, please click on Travel Clinic for further information.

 

Cervical Smears

 

The aim of the NHS Cervical Screening Programme is to reduce the number of women who develop cervical cancer and the number of women who die from the condition. Since the screening programme was introduced in the 1980s, the number of cervical cancer cases has decreased by about 7% each year.

 

All women who are registered with a GP are invited for cervical screening:

aged 25 to 49 – every three years

aged 50 to 64 – every five years

over 65 – only women who haven't been screened since age 50 or those who have recently had abnormal tests

 

Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix can be identified at an early stage and, if necessary, treated to stop cancer developing.

 

However, cervical screening isn't 100% accurate and doesn't prevent all cases of cervical cancer.

 

Screening is a personal choice and you have the right to choose not to attend.

 

Read about:

 

why cervical screening is offered

when cervical screening is offered

 

For further information please visit the link below:

 

//www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Cervical-screening-test/Pages/When-should-it-be-done.aspx

 

 

 

 

Child Health Surveillance

 

The Surgery provides a comprehensive child health surveillance service including developmental and pre-school checks.

 

In conjunction with the Health Visitor and your Practice your child should be reviewed at key points and receive vaccinations. Below is a standard example of a child development schedule up to school age.

 

 

 

PRE-SCHOOL REVIEWS – CHILD DEVELOPMENT

 

10 – 14 days    -          Visit from Health Visitor to mother and baby.

6 - 8 weeks      -          Medical assessment by Doctor.

8 weeks           -           1st diphtheria / tetanus / polio / whooping cough and HIB vaccination.

12 weeks         -           2nd diphtheria / tetanus / polio / whooping cough and HIB vaccination.

16 weeks         -           3rd diphtheria / tetanus / polio / whooping cough and HIB vaccination.

7 – 9 months   -          Development review by Health Visitor and Doctor.

12 months       -          Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMR) vaccination by Health Visitor.

24 months       -          Development Review by Health Visitor.

3 Years            -           Development review by Health Visitor and Medical Assessment by Doctor.

3 ½ Years        -           Pre-school booster vaccination.

 

Child Immunisation

 

It is essential for children to be fully immunised and we advise that current Department of Health recommendations should be strictly adhered to.

 

This means:

 

A full course of three doses of polio, pneumococcal, tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough, HiB(Meningitis) and meningitis C vaccines monthly from the post-natal visit at two months;

Measles mumps and rubella at fourteen months and booster diphtheria, tetanus, and polio at four and fourteen years.

In addition, MMR II is given also at the age of four or fourteen.

Bookings for vaccinations and immunisations can be made in the normal way through the appointments system.

Invitations to attend are sent automatically by the Health Authority who maintain the database of childhood immunisation.

 

Further information can be found on the NHS Immunisations Website

 

Chronic Disease Management

 

There is a growing epidemic of chronic disease in the UK due to tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and other risk factors.   Whilst it is important to prevent these diseases from happening in the first place (which we are also trying to do - termed 'primary prevention'), it is also important to prevent them from getting worse or causing other problems in patients who already have them (this is called 'secondary prevention').  With good management of chronic diseases, people can live longer.

 

A good example of this is diabetes - if you don't manage a patient with diabetes properly, their diabetes will get worse, and over a number of years, they may end up with kidney failure, blindness, heart attacks, strokes, gangrene of the legs and so on.  And then they end up being hospitalised.   If we treat a patient's diabetes and get their sugars under good control, we can stop them from getting most of these things and reduce unnecessary hospitalisation.  Clearly, this is very good news for the patient (as it stops their lives from being hampered by illness, infirmity and disability) but it's also good for the NHS in general because the cost of treating these  complications and subsequent hospitalisation would otherwise be very expensive.

 

Offering good co-ordinated care that is in line with national and local guidance reduces the fragmentation of care and also reduces the risk of clinical error (including medication errors) and thus litigation risk.  In summary, by optimising the management of a patient's chronic disease, EVERYONE is a winner.

 

EXAMPLES OF CHRONIC DISEASE

• Hypertension (high blood pressure)

• Angina/Heart Attacks

• Heart Failure

• Strokes

• Diabetes

• Asthma

• COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)

• Renal (Kidney) Failure

• Osteoporosis

• Cancer Care

• Drug & Alcohol misuse

• Mental Health Disorders like Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar disease, Schizophrenia and so on.

Family Planning

 

Healthcare services provided by contraception clinics

 

We offer a range of services and can provide:

 

  • confidential advice about contraception

  • the combined oral contraceptive pill

  • the progestogen-only pill

  • progestogen contraceptive injections

  • confidential advice about STIs , STI testing and treatment

  • cervical screening

  • "well woman" screening

 

 

 

We can also refer you for the following:

 

  • insertion or removal of the contraceptive implant

  • free emergency contraception

  • unplanned pregnancy advice

  • free pregnancy tests

  • pre-conception (pre-pregnancy) advice and information on fertility problems

  • fitting and checking of caps, diaphragms, IUDs (intrauterine devices, or coils) and IUSs (intrauterine systems, or hormonal coils)

  • Some contraception clinics may also offer specialist services, including:

  • counselling for incest, rape and sexual abuse

  • vasectomy (male sterilisation) counselling and procedures

  • pre-abortion and post-abortion counselling and referral

  • gynaecology clinics

  • menopause clinics

  • female sterilisation counselling and referral

 

General Health Checks

 

The NHS Health Check is a free check-up of your overall health. It can tell you whether you're at higher risk of getting certain health problems, such as:

 

  • heart disease

  • diabetes

  • kidney disease

  • stroke

  •  

If you're over 65, you will also be told the signs and symptoms of dementia to look out for.

 

If you're aged 40-74 and you haven't had a stroke, or you don't already have heart disease, diabetes or kidney disease, you should have an NHS Health Check every five years.

 

Any follow-up tests or appointments are also free of charge.

 

How will the NHS Health Check help me?

 

As well as measuring your risk of developing these health problems, an NHS Health Check gives you advice on how to prevent them.

The risk level varies from person to person, but everyone is at risk of developing heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease and some types of dementia.

Your NHS Health Check can detect potential health problems before they do real damage.

What happens at the NHS Health Check?

 

An NHS Health Check takes about15 minutes

 

The health professional – often a nurse or healthcare assistant – will ask you some simple questions about your lifestyle and family history, measure your height and weight, and take your blood pressure and do a blood test – often using a small finger prick test.

 

Based on this, they will be able to give you an idea of your chances of getting heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and diabetes.

 

If you're over 65, you will also be told the signs and symptoms of dementia to look out for.

 

You will then receive personalised advice to lower your risk. This could include talking about:

 

  • improve your diet and the amount of physical activity you do

  • taking medicines to lower your blood pressure or cholesterol

  • how to lose weight or stop smoking

  •  

If you prefer, you can ask to see a man or a woman, but the questions aren't embarrassing and you won't have to take your clothes off during the check.

 

Read more about what happens at an NHS Health Check.

Find out about the pros and cons of having an NHS Health Check.

 

Lifestyle Management

 

We can help you:

 

  • stop smoking

  • loose weight

  • get more active

  • eat healthier

  • relax and unwind

 

 

 

Levels of good and bad health are influenced by some of the choices we make, such as smoking, how physically active we are and whether we eat a healthy diet. Healthy lifestyle services support you to identify unhealthy behaviours and find the motivation to adopt a healthier way of living.

 

NHS Health Checks programme

If you are 35-74 years old you are eligible for an NHS Health Check. This programme aims to prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease through identifying people at high risk of these diseases and reducing the risk through the promotion of lifestyle changes, or who are living with undiagnosed disease.

 

Exercise on Referral (EOR)

Exercise on Referral (EOR) is a 12 week course to improve your health, wellbeing and help you manage a long-term condition through increasing your physical activity. EOR uses a range of activities including gym and studio classes, swimming lessons, aqua aerobics, Nordic walking and green gym sessions.

 

Weight management courses

Being a healthy weight is important for our health. It helps to prevent developing a long-term condition and also helps to manage existing long-term conditions.

 

The programme is free to Islington residents and people registered with an Islington GP. Anyone can attend if they are over 18 with a BMI in excess of 30, or a BMI of 25 with a long-term condition (e.g. hypertension or diabetes) or a BMI of 27.5 for south Asian communities.

 

Stop Smoking Services

The benefits of stopping smoking for your health are well known. Smoking causes a lot of damage to the body and puts you at risk of life-threatening health conditions.

 

NHS Stop Smoking Islington is a free service for those people who want to quit smoking. The service uses a tailored approach so you can choose to take part in group sessions or attend one-to-one sessions.

 

For more information on the lifestyle services available in Islington with the Health and wellbeing pages on the council website

Maternity Care

 

Congratulations if you are pregnant or considering becoming so in the future.

 

We encourage all newly pregnant women to see their GP for a health check. Antenatal care begins once your pregnancy has reached eight weeks, when we ask you to make a booking appointment with the midwife.

 

Make your booking appointment at the surgery or telephone our reception020 7272 3155.

 

Antenatal care will be undertaken mostly by the midwife but you are also able to see your GP at any time if there are problems.

 

 

IMPORTANT HEALTH ADVICE:

 

If you are planning to become pregnant you should take folic acid supplements - even if you are healthy and have a good diet. Once pregnant, continue to take the supplements for the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. If you take folic acid supplements it reduces the risk of having a baby born with a defect of their spinal cord such as spina bifida. It probably also reduces the risk of having a baby born with a cleft lip and palate, and of premature labour.

 

For most women the dose is 400 micrograms (0.4 mg) a day, if you are unsure please ask.

 

Eat a well balanced diet and include plenty of fluids, particularly if you feel nauseated.

 

Avoid eating soft cheeses, pate and un-pasteurised food products because of the risk of listeria.

 

Try to reduce alcohol if your intake is frequent or high. The government now recommend pregnant women should not drink alcohol during the course of their pregnancy.

 

If you smoke please consider stopping. Smoking is harmful to your unborn child, not to mention you. If you need help please ask, we run a smoke stop clinic and are very keen to help you stop.

 

Wear gloves and wash your hands if you are unable to avoid emptying cat or puppy letter trays.

 

Avoid lambing or milking ewes (not common these days!!)

Sexual Health & Contraception

 

Healthcare services provided by contraception clinics

 

We offer a range of services and can provide:

 

  • confidential advice about contraception

  • the combined oral contraceptive pill

  • the progestogen-only pill

  • progestogen contraceptive injections

  • confidential advice about STIs , STI testing and treatment

  • cervical screening

  • "well woman" screening

 

 

 

We can also refer you for the following:

 

  • insertion or removal of the contraceptive implant

  • free emergency contraception

  • unplanned pregnancy advice

  • free pregnancy tests

  • pre-conception (pre-pregnancy) advice and information on fertility problems

  • fitting and checking of caps, diaphragms, IUDs (intrauterine devices, or coils) and IUSs (intrauterine systems, or hormonal coils)

  • Some contraception clinics may also offer specialist services, including:

  • counselling for incest, rape and sexual abuse

  • vasectomy (male sterilisation) counselling and procedures

  • pre-abortion and post-abortion counselling and referral

  • gynaecology clinics

  • menopause clinics

  • female sterilisation counselling and referral

 

 

You can also visit a clinic close to you, click on the website below to find a clinic near you:

 

//www.sexualhealth.cnwl.nhs.uk/

Travel Clinic

 

Vaccination helps to prevent travellers from catching diseases to which they may be exposed in foreign countries. Some vaccinations are compulsory.

 

When Should I Have The Vaccine?

 

Generally speaking, it is ideal for us and you, if you seek advice at least six weeks before travel, especially if your trip is to an exotic or remote area. However, if you decide to travel at short notice, please consult us as soon as possible.

 

Whom Should I See?

 

If you require any vaccinations relating to foreign travel you need to make an appointment with the practice nurse to discuss your travel arrangements.  This will include which countries and areas within countries that you are visiting to determine what vaccinations are required.

 

A travel clinic questionnaire should be completed in advance of attending any appointment regarding travel and brought into the practice at least 48 hours before your appointment. Please ask at reception.

 

The following travel immunisations are available on the NHS:

 

· Hepatitis A

· Typhoid

· Diphtheria, tetanus and polio

 

The following travel immunisations are not available on the NHS and have to be paid for:

 

• Hepatitis B (when required solely for travel) - full course/ x3 vaccinations £70.00, £25.00 per dose

• Meningitis ACWY/ MENVEO £ 55.00 per dose (includes certificates)

• Rabies – full course/ x3 vaccinations £120.00 to be paid in advance

• Yellow Fever £55

 

Protection Against Malaria

 

There is no vaccine against malaria, but it is strongly advised that travellers take anti-malarial tablets (as well as other precautions) before they travel and for some time after, if they staying in a high risk area. Depending on which type you need, you can either buy them over the counter, or on a private prescription. There is a charge of £10.00 for a private prescription.

The pharmacist will charge you the cost of the tablets.

 

Book an appointment with the Practice nurse for your travel vaccines.

Weight Management

 

If you've tried and failed to lose weight, a visit to your GP could help.

 

Your GP or practice nurse can:

  • assess your general health

  • help identify the cause of your weight gain

  • work out if there are any health issues causing you to put on weight

  • discuss a plan to help you lose weight that suits you

  •  

Read on to find out what type of help you can get from your GP surgery.

 

Assessing your weight

 

First, your GP or practice nurse will want to assess whether your current weight is healthy or not. This means measuring your weight and height to calculate your body mass index (BMI).

 

You may also have your waist measured. Measuring your waist is a good way to check you're not carrying too much fat around your stomach, which can raise your risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and stroke.

 

You can have a healthy BMI and still have excess tummy fat – meaning you're still at risk of developing these diseases.

 

Your GP may take your blood pressure and carry out other tests, such as a blood test, to check for any health conditions that may be related to your weight.

 

You can also check your BMI by using our BMI calculator.

 

Diet and exercise

 

If you're overweight, changes to your diet and physical activity levels are the first step to helping you lose weight.

 

Your GP or practice nurse can help you assess your current diet and levels of physical activity, and set personal goals for change.

 

Your diet

 

You may be asked to keep a food diary – a written record of everything you eat – for one week.

This can help you and your GP identify habits, such as adding sugar to your tea, that you can change.

 

Exercise

 

Your physical activity levels can be measured with an activity diary.

Your GP may also suggest that you wear a pedometer for a week. A pedometer measures the number of steps you take and gives an indication of your daily activity levels.

 

Other weight loss services

 

Your GP surgery may refer you to other services, such as local weight loss groups. These could be provided by the NHS, or may be commercial services that you pay for.

If it's appropriate, you may be referred for exercise classes under the supervision of a qualified trainer.

Depending on where you live, the exercise programme may be free or offered at a reduced cost.

 

//www.nhs.uk/LiveWell/weight-loss-guide/Pages/weight-loss-guide.aspx

Well Man Clinic

 

We offer a range of health checks for men.

 

Your GP or Practice Nurse will assess the following:

 

  • your lifestyle, including diet, exercise, alcohol and smoking

  • medical history

  • weight and height

  • blood pressure

  • cholesterol

  • a urine test for diabetes or kidney infection

  • hearing and vision

  • lung function

 

 

You can also discuss your general health and have.

 

Please contact reception to book an appointment - 020 7272 3155.

 

 

Well Woman Clinic

 

We offer a well woman clinic, where you may be seen by a female doctor or practice nurse.

 

The well woman clinic will often provide advice on:

  • gynaecological problems

  • family planning (including fitting an IUD coil)

  • cervical smears

  • breast disease

  • the menopause

 

You can also discuss your general health and have your urine, weight, cholesterol and blood pressure checked.

 

Please contact reception to book an appointment - 020 7272 3155.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hornsey Rise Health Centre, Hornsey Rise, N19 3YU

nhs-choices.png

CQC ID:1-538904390

care_quality_commission_logo.png

© 2020 by The Beaumont Practice 

FULL WHEELCHAIR ACCESS

  • Instagram
  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon